Melting Glaciers and Shifting Landscapes: Adaptation to Climate Change in Peru

This summer, I'll be traveling through Peru, interviewing local community members and representatives from NGOs and government agencies about efforts to adapt to the impacts of climate change. Although my plans are constantly changing, my current itinerary will take me through Andean villages, coastal towns, deserts, and bustling cities. In some of these places, vanished glaciers and shifting seasons mean that climate change is already a daily reality. In others, increased droughts and stronger storms form a looming threat.

The international community continues to drag its feet on emissions reductions. Peruvians, meanwhile, are beginning to plan for life in a changed world. They are mapping the impacts of climate change in their own communities, educating farmers and families, and trying to devise new agricultural techniques. 

Climate change will wreak havoc on many places in the developing world. But with planning and foresight, it may be possible to avoid some of the worst consequences. Can Peruvian communities learn to live with absent glaciers and painful frosts? And what does it say about the current state of the world that they have to? 

Location

Peru
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